YAKSHI ? Parvati ?

Item Info

Origin RAJASTAN, India.
Period Late 12~13c.
Price 12.000$

Item Description

YAKSHI ? Parvati ?, Standing with a flower in her hand

Origin from a jain temple

White marble

few repairs in her fingers, please see in the images

87.5 cm high with stand. 73cm without

 

Yakshini (Sanskrit: याक्षिणि, also known as Yakshi and Yakkhini in Pali) are mythical beings of Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain mythology. Yakshini (Yakshi) is the female counterpart of the male Yaksha, and they are attendees of Kubera, the Hindu god of wealth who rules in the mythical Himalayan kingdom of Alaka. They are the guardians of the treasure hidden in the earth and resemble that of fairy. Yakshinis are often depicted as beautiful and voluptuous, with wide hips, narrow waists, broad shoulders, and exaggerated, spherical breasts. In Uddamareshvara Tantra, thirty-six Yakshinis are described, including their mantras and ritual prescriptions. A similar list of Yakshas and Yakshinis are given in the Tantraraja Tantra, where it says that these beings are givers of whatever is desired.

Parvati (Devanagari: पार्वती, IAST: Pārvatī) is the Hindu goddess of love, fertility and devotion. She is the gentle and nurturing aspect of Hindu goddess Shakti. She is the mother goddess in Hinduism and has many attributes and aspects. Each of her aspects is expressed with a different name, giving her over 100 names in regional Hindu mythologies of India.  Along with Lakshmi(goddess of wealth and prosperity) and Saraswati (goddess of knowledge and learning), she forms the trinity of Hindu goddesses.

Parvati is the wife of the Hindu deity Shiva – the destroyer, recycler and regenerator of universe and all life.  She is the daughter of mountain king Parvat and mother Mena. Parvati is the mother of Hindu deities Ganesha and Kartikeya.  Her elder sister is goddess Ganges.  Some communities also believe her to be the adopted sister of Vishnu.

With Śiva, Pārvatī is a central deity in Saivism sect of Hinduism. In Hindu belief, she is the recreative energy and power of Śiva, and she is the cause of bond that connects all beings and a means of their spiritual release.   In Hindu temples dedicated to her and Śiva, she is symbolically represented as argha or yoni.  She is found extensively in ancient Indian literature, and her statues and iconography grace ancient and medieval era Hindu temples all over South Asia and Southeast Asia.