PARVATI

Item Info

Origin Biha, India.
Period PALA DYNASTY , 11~12c.
Price 8.000$

Item Description

PARVATI  STANDING, BELOW HER ARE HER TWO SONS GANESHA AND KARTIKEYA

Black volcanic stone

66cm high

Parvati (Devanagari: पार्वती, IAST: Pārvatī) is the Hindu goddess of love, fertility and devotion. She is the gentle and nurturing aspect of Hindu goddess Shakti. She is the mother goddess in Hinduism and has many attributes and aspects. Each of her aspects is expressed with a different name, giving her over 100 names in regional Hindu mythologies of India.  Along with Lakshmi(goddess of wealth and prosperity) and Saraswati (goddess of knowledge and learning), she forms the trinity of Hindu goddesses.

Parvati is the wife of the Hindu deity Shiva – the destroyer, recycler and regenerator of universe and all life.  She is the daughter of mountain king Parvat and mother Mena. Parvati is the mother of Hindu deities Ganesha and Kartikeya.  Her elder sister is goddess Ganges.  Some communities also believe her to be the adopted sister of Vishnu.

With Śiva, Pārvatī is a central deity in Saivism sect of Hinduism. In Hindu belief, she is the recreative energy and power of Śiva, and she is the cause of bond that connects all beings and a means of their spiritual release.   In Hindu temples dedicated to her and Śiva, she is symbolically represented as argha or yoni.  She is found extensively in ancient Indian literature, and her statues and iconography grace ancient and medieval era Hindu temples all over South Asia and Southeast Asia.

Ganesha (/ɡəˈneɪʃə/; Sanskrit: गणेश, ), also known as Ganapati and Vinayaka, is one of the best-known and most worshipped deities in the Hindu pantheon. His image is found throughout India, Sri Lanka and Nepal.  Hindu sects worship him regardless of affiliations  ]Devotion to Ganesha is widely diffused and extends to Jains and Buddhists.

Although he is known by many attributes, Ganesha’s elephant head makes him easy to identify.  Ganesha is widely revered as the remover of obstacles, the patron of arts and sciences and the devaof intellect and wisdom.  As the god of beginnings, he is honoured at the start of rituals and ceremonies. Ganesha is also invoked as patron of letters and learning during writing sessions.  Several texts relate mythological anecdotes associated with his birth and exploits and explain his distinct iconography.

Ganesha emerged as a distinct deity in the 4th and 5th centuries CE, during the Gupta Period, although he inherited traits from Vedic and pre-Vedic precursors.